WHA in the News

WHA in the News

‘We have to do more research on women’

Women’s Heart Alliance Medical Advisor Dr. Holly Andersen, Director of Education and Outreach at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, discusses why heart disease kills more women every year than all cancers combined on the “Real Women, Real Stories” channel. “Most of what we know about heart disease has come from research done on men, designed for men. And this has greatly benefited men, but women have not fared as well,” she says. “And while death rates have been declining in this country for decades for men, death rates due to heart disease …

WHA in the News

#StreisandinDC: WHA co-founder Barbra Streisand addresses NIH

The Washington Post’s Reliable Source and Politico’s Playbook were among the news media that covered Women’s Heart Alliance co-founder Barbra Streisand’s visit to D.C. to address the National Institutes of Health for the prestigious J. Edward Rall Cultural Lecture on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Read more here. Here are some of the highlights: “Better understanding of sex differences will not only fill in critical gaps in women’s health, but can improve men’s health as well,” Barbra Streisand, delivering the 2018 J. Edward Rall Lecture at the NIH, on May 15. Barbra Streisand thanks NIH Director Francis Collins, “You have done …

WHA in the News

Barbra Streisand in USA Today: Heart disease research and treatment neglects women, and it’s killing them

Women are needlessly dying because research and treatment of cardiovascular disease is focused on men. It’s time for equity in heart health as well as in Hollywood. Read on USA Today. By Barbra Streisand, Opinion Contributor In the past year, Hollywood’s uncomfortable look in the mirror has shown a place where inequity is profound, sexism is rampant, and gender bias and the subjugation of women are the norm. Women have not been equals in the entertainment industry, and the reckoning is now. However, the passion for equity that I have carried throughout my life extends into the world of science …

WHA in the News

WHA discusses heart, brain connections

Major depression. Alzheimer’s. Heart disease. These health risks are some of the major public health challenges of our time — and women are disproportionately affected. On Wednesday, Feb. 28, from noon – 1 p.m. ET, Women’s Heart Alliance CEO British Robinson joins a panel of experts to discuss new discoveries in research focusing on women’s heart and brain health, and how they may transform our understanding of heart disease, Alzheimer’s and depression. British will share how the WHA translates these cutting edge discoveries into programs and policies that affect women’s every day lives — from our Cities and Communities Heart …

WHA in the News

Woman’s Day Spotlights WHA’s Cities and Communities With Heart Initiative

It takes a village to improve women’s heart health. In Nashville, where we launched our Cities and Communities With Heart Initiative, we have convened local government, health and academic institutions, nonprofits and businesses to come together to stop women’s needless deaths from heart disease and stroke. The February 2018 issue of Woman’s Day highlights our work in Nashville in a special “Heart-Health Update” and shares three ways every woman can make her community more heart-healthy. Read more below.

Press Release

Mayor Megan Barry and the Women’s Heart Alliance Launch Effort to Improve Heart Health of Metro Workforce

For Immediate Release Program is a component of WHA’s Cities and Communities with Heart Initiative aimed at reducing deaths among women in Nashville from heart disease and stroke NASHVILLE, Tenn. (September 21, 2017)  – With more women dying from heart disease and stroke in Nashville than all cancers combined, Mayor Megan Barry and the Women’s Heart Alliance (WHA) unveiled WHA’s Cities and Communities with Heart Workforce Initiative with the goal of improving the heart health of female municipal workers. Employees from the Mayor’s Office and three Metro departments participated in heart health screenings Wednesday at First Tennessee Park. The goal of the screenings …

Heart and Soul

Tonya Lewis Lee on Equity in Health

I grew up in a household where both of my parents worked. My father was the breadwinner with the high-powered job that propelled my family solidly into America’s upper middle class. My mother’s job as a teacher, and later, as a social worker, was also important to our family’s bottom line. Like many moms, she was responsible for taking care of the house and the needs of me, my sister and my father in addition to her own needs. My father took care of the outside—mowing the lawn and doing handyman-type work. My sister and I had to help and …